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Find us on Arran

To get to Arran you will have almost certainly come by Calmac ferry. Calmac operate between Ardrossan Harbour and Brodick and, in summer months a smaller ferry operates between Claonaig (Kintyre) and Lochranza.
Your holiday really begins with the ferry crossing. The main ferry crossing from Ardrossan is served by the MV Caledonian Isles supplemented in the summer months by MV Isle of Arran. Both vessels have excellent facilities including reasonably priced restaurants, snack bars and a licensed bar and also play facilities, a shop and comfortable lounges and observation areas. The crossing takes about 55 mins and if you are bringing a car to Arran it is advisable to book in advance. Ferry fares will be significantly cheaper from October 2014 due to REP.

Sailing from Claonaig takes about 30 minutes but the route is operated by a smaller ferry which does not have catering facilities on board but offers a great experience and wonderful views.

For more information and to book online contact Caledonian MacBrayne at www.calmac.co.uk or telephone +44(0)8000 66 5000

Carraig Mhor is in the lovely village of Lamlash on the east coast of Arran and only three miles south of the main ferry terminal in Brodick. We overlook the sea-side village green and the beach is only a few yards away.

Directions from Brodick Ferry terminal

Leaving the ferry terminal turn left onto the A841 (the Shore Road) – the only circular A road in the UK – follow the road for about 3 miles to Lamlash from Brodick. From Lochranza follow to A841 south through the mountains and along the east coast to Brodick, then continue to Lamlash to find us at Carraig Mhor on right hand side of the main street facing the Holy Isle.


The Isle of Arran

Arran has possibly the most varied landscape of any of the Scottish isles and is commonly referred to as Scotland in Miniature. The geology of the island is of interest and gives rise to the dramatic change in scenery between the north and south of the island. Geology enthusiast may enjoy the coastal walk to see Hutton's 'unconformity'. The Highland Boundary fault which, as its name suggest separates the Highlands from the lowlands of Scotland runs through Arran giving rise to rugged mountains with jagged ice shattered edges  and beautiful corries formed in the Ice Age in the north and the softer rolling hills in the south.The variety in the landscape which offers gentle valleys, rugged coastline, sandy beaches, waterfalls and green valleys is reflected in the variety of wildlife and plants to be found on Arran.

Driving around the the Isle of Arran is easy as there are only three main roads – and the Shore Road is circular so just keep going and you can't get lost! Two roads cut across the island in an east-west direction- The String Road (B880) and The Ross Road which cuts across the southern part of the island is a single lane road with passing places and has recently been upgraded. Please take care driving on our roads and watch out for cyclists and walkers.